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Published 13.04.2018 - Updated 13.04.2018

Growing seasonal extremes in ocean acidity

A new study published in the journal Nature Climate Change finds that if atmospheric CO2 continues to increase, the differences in extremes in surface-ocean acidity between summer and winter will roughly double by the end of the century. The amplified seasonality in acidity is projected to occur in all ocean regions. In the tropics and subtropics, associated impacts on organisms are likely to worsen during summer when acidity is highest and improve during winter when acidity is lowest; in colder ocean regions, these summer-winter tendencies are reversed. Future projections of these seasonal extremes come from nine Earth System Models that participated in the last Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Assessment Report. Projections were made not only for acidity (hydrogen ion concentration) but also for a saturation index that indicates how suitable conditions are for calcification, a process by which corals and shell builders produce hard skeletal material. The seasonal amplitude of that index (the aragonite saturation state) was found to generally decline as atmospheric CO2 increases. With time this could affect the ability of shell forming organisms to grow, with summer seawater conditions becoming less suitable for growth over most of the ocean.
Article: Kwiatkowski, L., & Orr, J. C. (2018). Diverging seasonal extremes for ocean acidification during the twenty-first century. Nature Climate Change, 8(2), 141-145. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-017-0054-0

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Published 30.03.2018 - Updated 30.03.2018

Call for Abstracts - 8th CJK IMBeR Symposium

IMBeR will hold its 8th China-Japan-Korea (CJK) Symposium at the East China Normal University in Shanghai, China from 17-19 September 2018.
The theme of this regional IMBeR symposium is Marine Biogeochemical Sciences for the Sustainability of the West Pacific Biosphere.
The focus will be on analyzing the impact of climate change and anthropogenic forcing on physical processes and biogeochemical cycles, ecosystem structure and functions, and fisheries in the West Pacific region, and how these combined complex interactions, in turn, influence marine ecosystems and human society.

The session themes are:
* Advances in observation and modelling of physical and biogeochemical processes in the West Pacific region
* The response of marine ecosystems to natural and anthropogenic forcing: past, present and future
* Responses of society to global change in marine systems: ways forward (this session will be expanded upon in a training course on the 3rd day)

The number of participants will be limited to 100, so you are encouraged to register soon and submit an abstrac, at: http://mform.imr.no/view.php?id=78294

Deadline for applications is 15 June 2018.

More information on the CJK symposium is available at:
http://imber.info/en/events/china-japan-korea-imber-symposia/cjk8

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Published 19.03.2018 - Updated 19.03.2018

Welcome to the new IMBeR endorsed project – MEMFiS !

IMBeR is pleased to announce its endorsement of the Marine Ecosystem Modelling and Forecasting System in the China Seas and Northwestern Pacific (MEMFiS) project.

China´s coastal regions are under increasing pressure from both climate change and intensive human activity. The ecology of the coastal regions are particularly threatened by eutrophication, red tides and hypoxia events, etc. This raises the question of whether, and to what extent, ecological changes in coastal regions can be predicted, in order to preserve and retain their function and economic value.

Focusing on the ecology of the Bohai, Yellow, East and South China Seas, and the Northwestern Pacific, the MEMFis project aims to develop an integrated modelling and forecasting framework, using high-resolution physical-ecosystem models and data from multiple sources. By investigating ecosystem variability at different temporal and spatial scales, several key scientific questions will be tackled. Marine ecosystem variability will be addressed at the interface of different systems, parameterizations optimized for biogeochemical processes in different regions, data assimilation and ecosystem forecasting using multiple observations not only from moorings, buoys and ships, but also from bio-Argo, gliders and high-resolution satellite imagery.

More than 15 research institutes are involved in MEMFiS including the Second Institute of Oceanography, Tianjin University, the South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, and the National Marine Environmental Forecasting Center.

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Published 09.02.2018 - Updated 09.02.2018

Climate vulnerability and resilience in the most valuable North American fishery

Climate change is impacting global fisheries and societies that depend on them. Identifying climate adaptation measures requires understanding of how environmental changes and management policies interact in driving fishery productivity. Coincident with the recent exceptional warming of the northwest Atlantic Ocean and removal of large predatory fish, the American lobster has become the most valuable fishery resource in North America. A new PNAS paper by Arnault Le Bris et al. shows that interactions between warming waters, ecosystem changes, and differences in conservation efforts led to the simultaneous collapse of the lobster fishery in southern New England and record-breaking landings in the Gulf of Maine. The results demonstrate that sound, widely adopted fishery conservation measures based on fundamental biological principles can help capitalize on gains and mitigate losses caused by global climate change.

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Published 01.02.2018 - Updated 01.02.2018

Global Change in Marine Systems: Societal and Governing Responses – a new publication by the IMBeR Human Dimensions Working Group (HDWG)

Marine social and ecological systems are facing multiple challenges due to global change. The IMBeR Human Dimensions Working Group’s recently published book “Global Change in Marine Systems: Societal and Governing Responses”, examines some of the actions taken in response to an environmental or other impact resulting from global change in 20 case studies from a range of marine systems around the world. The "I-ADApT" analytical decision support tool developed by the HDWG to help decision makers consider possible responses to global change, based on experiences elsewhere was applied to the case studies. Assessment of the societal and governing responses, highlighted similarities and differences between “the good, the bad and the ugly” - successful, and less successful, responses. Beth Fulton says “…This is the kind of go-to guide that will see us jump from simply identifying problems to doing something about it and finding our way to robust solutions." Rosemary Ommer: “While emphasizing on the importance of in-depth disciplinary perspectives, it also applies an innovative framework for cross-disciplinary analysis, which the governability of these systems requires. Thus, the book has important lessons for policy makers, management practitioners and academics alike." Read the full reviews here

 

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